GPSS/H(ID:4716/gps012)

Extended GPSS 


Wolverine systems extension of GPSS-V, with compiler capabilities


Related languages
GPSS V => GPSS/H   Extension of
GPSS/H => SLX   Incorporated some features of

References:
  • Henriksen, J. O. & Crain, R. C., "GPSS/H User's Manual", Wolverine Software Corporation, 1983 view details
  • Seila, Andrew F. "Discrete event simulation in Pascal with SIMTOOLS" view details Abstract: In recent years a great deal of research effort has been devoted to improving simulation software. Products currently available for discrete event simulation include GPSS/H, SIMSCRIPT II.5, SIMULA, SLAM, SIMAN, SIMPAS, PASSIM, and ASSE, to name a few. Some of these products (SIMSCRIPT II.5 and SIMPAS, for example) use process-oriented approaches. All of them assume an entity-attribute-set basis for describing the model to be simulated. SIMSCRIPT II.5 and SIMULA are general-purpose simulation programming languages. Alternatively, GPSS/H, SIMAN, SLAM, Micro NET, INTERACTIVE and ASSE are “packages” (I won't debate whether the terminology “language” is appropriate or not) that were developed primarily for simulating queueing networks, such as might be found in manufacturing or computer systems. SIMPAS is a preprocessor for a Pascal program that converts “simulation” statements into Pascal code for compilation and execution.
          in The 16th Winter Simulation Conference 28-30 November 1984 Sheraton Dallas Hotel, Dallas, TX view details
  • Henriksen, James O. and Crain, Robert C. The GPSS/H Reference Manual Wolverine Software Corporation, 1989 view details
          in The 16th Winter Simulation Conference 28-30 November 1984 Sheraton Dallas Hotel, Dallas, TX view details
  • Brumer, D. T., and R.C. Crain. "GPSS in the 1990s" view details
          in The 23rd Winter Simulation Conference 8-11 December 1991 The Arizona Biltmore, Phoenix, AZ view details
  • Schriber, Thomas J. "An Introduction to Simulation Using GPSS/H" John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1991 view details
          in The 23rd Winter Simulation Conference 8-11 December 1991 The Arizona Biltmore, Phoenix, AZ view details
  • Banks, Jerry; Carson, John and Sy, John "Getting Started With GPSS/H" Wolverine Software Corporation, Second Edition 1995 view details
          in The 23rd Winter Simulation Conference 8-11 December 1991 The Arizona Biltmore, Phoenix, AZ view details
  • Nance, Richard E. "Simulation programming languages: an abridged history" view details
          in The 27th Winter Simulation Conference 3-6 December 1995 Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, VA view details
  • Ståhl, Ingolf "GPSS - 40 YEARS OF DEVELOPMENT" pp577-585 view details Abstract: This year GPSS celebrates its 40th birthday. This paper
    reports on the development during these 40 years, starting
    with the first version developed by Gordon at IBM in
    1961, and the following development of GPSS II, GPSS
    III, GPSS/360 and GPSS V, all IBM products. A major
    section is devoted to GPSS/H, which has dominated the
    GPSS scene during the last years. There is one section on
    the GPSSR family of GPSS versions and one on GPSS/PC
    and GPSS World. There are also many GPSS systems,
    projects and ideas of a mainly academic nature. A great
    number of GPSS textbooks are noted. The concluding section
    discusses the reasons for the popularity of GPSS. Extract: GPSS/H and Wolverine
    3 GPSS/H
    The GPSS versions mentioned above, were all run on mainframes and the GPSS versions were all, with the exception for the Norden version, developed by computer manufacturers. In the late 70's and early 80's there was, due to the policy of unbundling and the emergence of the minicomputers, a movement towards software being developed by independent software houses. This was also the case of GPSS. Most noteworthy of the GPSS versions developed by independent software firms is GPSS/H. It has no doubt during at least the last decade been the GPSS software with the largest use. Against this background, it appears reasonable to give a more detailed review of GPSS/H than of other GPSS versions.
    The history of GPSS/H started with J. Henriksen taking T. Schriber's course in GPSS at the University of Michigan in 1968. At this time, a major critique of the GPSS versions then used (mainly GPSS/360) was the slow execution. Working with GPSS/360 at the Computing Center of the University of Michigan, Henriksen got ideas about how to make a much faster GPSS. The main key to increasing the speed of execution was to make GPSS fully compiled, instead of mainly interpreted, which had been the case with all the IBM versions. GPSS/H was completely upwards compatible with GPSS V, but as mentioned much faster. Henriksen started Wolverine Software in 1976, roughly the same time as IBM stopped supporting GPSS V.
    Several blocks were added to those of GPSS V. When the first GPSS/H was released in 1977 it had a total of 58 block types. This has over the years increased (62 in the 2nd version of 1988 and 68 in the 3rd version of 1995). The present version of GPSS/H has a total of over 70 block types. Another important extension has concerned control statements, allowing among other things for looping and hence simple run control. A noteworthy difference to GPSS V is the handling of several repeated runs, in GPSS/H requiring far fewer statements than in GPSS V. In contrast to GPSS V, which allowed for names of at most 5 characters, GPSS/H allows names of up to 8 characters, provided they do not conflict with reserved words. The only major difference as regards the result when running old GPSS V programs is that GPSS/H has floating-point clock values, while GPSS V (as well as all earlier IBM versions) had integer values. This will lead to fewer events in GPSS/H scheduled simultaneously and fewer cases of unexpected results due to truncation of clock values.
    GPSS/H has in a number of comparative test runs proved to run a lot faster than GPSS V, by at least a factor of 5; (Henriksen 1983) and has also for similar programs in other simulation languages proved to execute several times faster (Abed et al. 1985). Another significant improvement compared to GPSS V was a new interactive debugger, allowing for ?just in time? debugging. GPSS/H has been gradually improved in many directions, also in the 90's. In 1993, a Runtime version of GPSS/H was released, allowing the running of precompiled version of GPSS/H program, and in the third version of GPSS/H from 1995, 23 new statistical distributions were introduced.
    The compiler of the first version of GPSS/H was written in assembly language for the IBM main frames. In the 80's with the release of GPSS/H versions for several kinds of minicomputers like the VAX, the compiler was rewritten in C. In 1988 a version for the PC (MS/DOS) was released. It should be mentioned that GPSS/H is very similar across all platforms. There is no Windows version nor any GUI version. The development efforts of Wolverine have instead been focused on SLX and Proof Animation.
    GPSS/H is described in manuals, and in some textbooks, by Banks and others (1989) and by Schriber (1991). Because of GPSS/H's dominating position in the GPSS area and due to its open structure, with all program input and output being in the form of ASCII text, a great amount of software has been developed that connects to GPSS/H, both at the front-end, producing (parts of) programs, and at the back-end, producing better, more readable output. I shall here mention a few of these programs. In the 1980s two software packages both with animation capabilities were presented to be used with GPSS/H: TESS (The Extended Simulation System from Pritsker & Associates) and Auto- Gram of AutoSimulations. These animation packages became uninteresting for GPSS/H users with the advent of Wolverine's own Proof Animation at the start of the 90's.
    AutoMod, also from AutoSimulations, was initially a pre-processor that automatically generated GPSS/H program code. In the 80's researchers also sought to use RESQ as a front-end for GPSS/H, (Mathewson 1989). In 1993, R. Elnicki presented a program RUN as a fast front? end or ?shell? for running GPSS/H on PCs (Wolverine 1993). Also in the early 90's, Mogul of High Performance Software was used for generating GPSS/H code for communication systems, (Rodrigues 1993). In the early 90's, a German firm, GfL in Aachen, released GPSS/H EDITOR, a front-end for inputting GPSS/H programs mainly by clicking on buttons with text for blocks, but without a true Graphical Users Interface, i.e. without a block symbol menu or block diagram (Knepper and Krönchen 1993). Since 1994 a copy of UniFit II is bundled with every commercial GPSS/H Professional version, allowing the user to determine the best probability distribution for the data. The mid 90's also saw the release of SIMSTAT (from MC2 Analysis Systems), which reads and analyzes output generated by GPSS/H (Crain 1996).
          in The 33rd Winter Simulation Conference 9-12 December 2001 Crystal Gateway Marriott, Arlington, VA view details
  • Henriksen, James O. and Crain, Robert C. The GPSS/H Reference Manual Wolverine Software Corporation Third Edition, revised 2004 view details
          in The 33rd Winter Simulation Conference 9-12 December 2001 Crystal Gateway Marriott, Arlington, VA view details
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